Barrasso: Administration Must Stop Wasting U.S. Taxpayer Dollars on International Climate Change Bailouts
December 2, 2010

Contacts:

Matt Dempsey Matt_Dempsey@epw.senate.gov (202) 224-5642

David Lungren David_Lungren@epw.senate.gov (202) 224-5642

Barrasso: Administration Must Stop Wasting U.S. Taxpayer Dollars on International Climate Change Bailouts

At a time of record deficit spending and national debt, the Administration decides to transfer billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars to developing nations in the name of climate change

Link to Letter

WASHINGTON, DC -U.S. Senator John Barrasso (R-WY), ranking member of the Subcommittee on Oversight in the Senate Environment and Public Works Committee, strongly opposes the Obama administration's decision to transfer billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars to developing nations in the name of climate change.  

Today, Senator Barrasso, along with Senators James Inhofe (R-OK), David Vitter (R-LA) and George Voinovich (R-OH) sent a letter to Secretary of State, Hillary Clinton, demanding that the administration freeze further spending requests to implement international climate change finance programs.  Barrasso delivered the following statement about his letter: 

"We have a $1.29 trillion deficit and are $13.6 trillion in debt. It makes no sense for the United States to now spend billions of taxpayer dollars to fight climate change in other countries. Americans are concerned about jobs, the economy, the debt and spending.  If the administration is serious about listening to the American people, they will cancel this international climate change bailout."

 

Full Text of the letter:

December 2, 2010

The Honorable Hillary Rodham Clinton

Secretary of State

U.S. Department of State

2201 C Street NW

Washington, DC 20520

 

Dear Secretary Clinton:

As the sixteenth Conference of the Parties of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change is set to enter its second week, we remain opposed to the U.S. commitment to full implementation of the Copenhagen Accord, which will transfer billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars to developing nations in the name of climate change.

We understand that climate-related appropriations for 2010 totaled $1.3 billion, which is more than triple from 2009 levels at $315 million. The President also requested another sizeable increase of $1.9 billion for Fiscal Year 2011, as the Administration seeks to fund its share of this $100 billion global commitment by 2020.  We do not believe that billions of U.S. taxpayer dollars should be transferred to developing countries through unaccountable multilateral or bilateral channels for adaptation, deforestation and other international climate finance programs.

In the November 2nd election, Americans clearly expressed their concerns about record deficit spending.  The U.S. Treasury Department's Fiscal Year 2010 year-end report showed that the federal deficit hit $1.29 trillion, topping $1 trillion for the second straight year in a row. These deficits are in addition to our existing debt, which is currently at $13.6 trillion. We simply cannot afford any new massive spending programs with such debt owed by America's future generations.

Concern about deficits and spending stems in large part from the fact that millions of Americans are struggling to find employment.  In October, the unemployment rate in the United States stood at 9.6 percent.  As spending dramatically increases, Americans believe there is a connection between Washington profligacy and the ability of employers to create jobs. 

In addition, several of the findings of the UN's Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) concerning the eventual impacts of climate change in developing countries were found to be exaggerated or simply not true.  We understand that reforms of the IPCC process are currently underway and we believe that no American taxpayer dollars should be committed to a global climate fund based on information that is not accurate.

In light of the federal government's dire financial situation and the poor state of the economy, in addition to ongoing reviews at the IPCC, we request that the Administration freeze further spending requests to implement international climate change finance programs. This would include making no additional international commitments to fund such programs.

###




Majority Office
410 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg.Washington, DC 20510-6175
phone: 202-224-6176
Minority Office
456 Dirksen Senate Office Bldg.Washington, DC 20510-6175
phone: 202-224-8832